Free Brain Scans This Week in Lower Manhattan

You are here

Free Brain Scans This Week in Lower Manhattan
12-10-2018

After a recent stay in downtown Brooklyn, the Mobile MRI Unit of the Brain Tumor Foundation will be stationed in the Wall Street area from December 10 through December 16, 2018 offering free MRI scans to the public as part of its Road to Early Detection campaign. “Finding brain tumors while they are still small significantly increases treatment options and improves the chance of a cure,” says Dr. Philip Stieg, neurosurgeon-in-chief of NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and president of the Brain Tumor Foundation. Dr. Stieg is also the founder and chairman of the Weill Cornell Medicine Brain and Spine Center, which is co-sponsoring with Weill Cornell Medicine Imaging the mobile unit’s first week in lower Manhattan.

The mobile unit will be parked at 7 World Trade Center/250 Greenwich Street in lower Manhattan. Individuals must make an appointment for a scan by calling 844-BTF-SCAN (844-283-7226) or visiting www.btfscanny.org (no unscheduled scans can be performed).

The mobile unit will stay downtown from December 17 to December 20 to provide free scans to first responders (with official ID presented). This week is sponsored by the Schreiber family in tribute to Michael and Nancy Schreiber. First responders may make an appointment for a scan by calling 844-BTF-SCAN (844-283-7226) or visiting www.btfscan911.org.

Brain scan data gathered through this initiative will be analyzed by experts at Columbia University Medical Center and the Mailman School of Public Health in New York in conjunction with Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. The research component of this campaign may shed new light on the causes and sources of brain cancer and help make treatment more effective when caught early.

The Mobile MRI Unit was recently featured on CBS News; see the video below for more.

More than 800,000 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed today with a tumor in the central nervous system, and as many as a million more are living with brain tumors that have yet to be detected. As many as 40% of all other cancers metastasize to the brain.