Cerebrovascular Surgery

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Ways to Give

Thank you for choosing to support the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center, New York City's leading center for groundbreaking neuroscience research and #1 hospital for patient care.

Your contribution may be directed to any specific area of brain and spine disease research, sponsoring the recruitment of world-class doctors, helping us build state-of-the-art patient care facilities or continue to bring the latest in neurosurgical technology to accelerate patient recovery and improve outcomes. Your contribution, regardless of level, is deeply valued and appreciated.

Wide-Neck Aneurysms: The Neuroform Stent and the Enterprise Stent System

These two stents are small metallic mesh tubes designed to keep the coils in the aneurysm sac, in intracranial wide-neck aneurysms.

Weill Cornell Neurosurgeons Conduct First Hands-on Neurotrauma Training Course in Tanzania

In March 2014, a neurosurgical team from the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center conducted the first neurotrauma training course for health care providers from East, Central, and Southern Africa, teaching much-needed neurosurgical skills to African surgeons, physicians, residents, and nurses.  The weeklong course, presented in collaboration with the Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute (MOI) in Dar Es Salaam, was led by Dr. Roger Härtl, who started the Cornell Neurosurgery Initiative in Tanzania in 2008. Dr. Härtl was joined this year by Neurosurgeon-in-Chief Dr.

Minimally Invasive/Endoscopic Neurosurgery

The neurosurgical team at the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center

Minimally invasive neurosurgery utilizes small, flexible, lighted tubes called endoscopes to visualize various parts of the brain, skull base, or spinal cord through small openings. Endoscopes serve as small microscopes, magnifying critical anatomical structures so the surgeon can easily see the various diseased areas requiring repair, removal, or replacement. Because the use of endoscopes is much less intrusive into these anatomical structures than is conventional surgery, endoscopic neurosurgery is referred to as minimally invasive neurosurgery.

Conditions We Treat

MicroVention Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support LVIS or LVIS Jr. Humanitarian Use Device (LVIS HUD)

The LVIS HUD is a stent (a small metallic mesh tube) that will be placed across the neck of the aneurysm; it is intended to remodel the blood vessel as well as provide support for the coils that will be placed inside the aneurysm. The purpose of the coils is to facilitate aneurysm occlusion by blocking blood flow into the aneurysm. The purpose of the treatment is to close off the aneurysm neck and lower the chance of aneurysm rupture.

CREST (Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting) Trial

CREST is a prospective, multi-centered, NIH-funded trial to compare the results of treating carotid stenosis with either carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting.

Acoustic Neuroma Program

Dr. Philip E. Stieg and Dr. Samuel Selesnick

The Acoustic Neuroma Program at the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center is dedicated to delivering advanced treatments to patients affected by these tumors. The multidisciplinary team, led by neurosurgeon Dr. Philip E. Stieg and neurotologist Dr. Samuel H. Selesnick, offers leading-edge treatments with options designed to preserve hearing.

Conditions We Treat

Stereotactic Radiosurgery

The Stereotactic Radiosurgery Program at the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center offers the latest in advanced minimally invasive and non-invasive treatments for a wide range of conditions.

Conditions We Treat

Clinical Research Fellowship in Interventional Neuroradiology (INR)

The Department of Neurosurgery at Weill Cornell Medical College offers a clinical research fellowship in Interventional neuroradiology (INR), a relatively new field that combines advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques with endoscopic surgical procedures. INR specialists are neurosurgeons with advanced training in radiology who perform minimally invasive endoscopic techniques using high-tech imaging equipment to guide their work.

Junior Resident Boot Camp 2015

For the third year in a row, Weill Cornell was chosen as the east coast venue for the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS) Junior Resident "boot camp" - an intensive hands-on training course that matches experienced neurosurgeons with young residents in dissection labs and simulation labs. The course takes place in the Weill Cornell Medical College Gross Anatomy Lab, in the Surgical Innovations Lab for Skull Base Microneurosurgery, and in the Skills Acquisition and Innovation Laboratory (SAIL).

Prospective Quality of Life in Patients with Colloid Cysts of the Third Ventricle

This study sets out to assess the neuropsychological status and quality of life of patients who present with a colloid cyst of the third ventricle.

Contact Dr. Souweidane: 212-746-2363

Venous Sinus Stenting in Patients with Refractory Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

There are many patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, who do not respond to available treatments or experience medication-related side effects that affect their quality of life. A new clinical trial aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of venous sinus stenting in patients with refractory IIH and significant venous sinus stenosis.

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