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Blog Archive

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Dr. Ronald Brisman: An Appreciation

By Theodore Schwartz, MD
David and Ursel Barnes Professor of Minimally Invasive Neurosurgery
Vice Chairman of Clinical Research
 

I was deeply saddened to learn of the recent passing of Dr. Ronald Brisman, another neurosurgeon lost to Covid-19. Dr. Brisman, like Dr. Jim Goodrich, the pediatric neurosurgeon who recently passed away, was a product of The Neurological Institute training program, which was then part of Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, now NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Dr.

A Virus That Knows No Boundaries

By Philip E. Stieg, PhD, MD
Neurosurgeon-in-Chief, NewYork-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medicine
Margaret and Robert J. Hariri, MD ’87, PhD ’87 Professor of Neurological Surgery

The Covid-19 pandemic claimed another talented neurosurgeon this week with the passing of Dr. Ronald Brisman. Coming so soon on the heels of Dr. Jim Goodrich’s death from the virus, this news was especially hard to hear.

Redeployed to the Covid-19 Front Lines

By Ibrahim Hussain, MD
Neurosurgical Resident

I began my seven-year neurosurgical training program in 2013, so by March of this year I was just about done – then the pandemic changed everything. NewYork-Presbyterian is the top-rated hospital in the city and one of the best in the country, and the emergency rooms and ICUs started filling up quickly with Covid-19 patients. Every health care provider in the hospital was put on notice that this was an all-hands-on-deck effort. No matter what department we normally worked in, we should be prepared to be called upon to care for these patients.

A Memory Exercise for Stressful Times

By Amanda Sacks-Zimmerman, PhD, and Jessica Spat-Lemus, PhD

The same factors that threaten your attentional domain (the overall stress of the current crisis combined with psychosocial stressors at home or at work) can also harm your memory.

Information Overload

By Philip E. Stieg, PhD, MD
Neurosurgeon-in-Chief, NewYork-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medicine
Margaret and Robert J. Hariri, MD ’87, PhD ’87 Professor of Neurological Surgery

The human brain is not wired for this. Our twenty-first century lives had already taken us far away from what our brains evolved to do – but now, in the middle of a pandemic, we are in over our heads.